Creator of Lucky Compiler (http://luckycompiler.com), featuring interviews with eminent artists and photographers from across the world; It’s Quoted (http://its-quoted.com), a tumblr blog dedicated exclusively to celebrate the power of words; Digital Filbert (http://digitalfilbert.com), devoted to my musings about the world of web and beyond.

I deal with painting as I deal with things, I paint a window just as I look out of a window. If an open window looks wrong in a picture, I draw the curtain and shut it, just as I would in my own room. In painting, as in life, you must act directly.
Pablo Picasso (via itsquoted)
The goal to be reached is the mind’s insight into what knowing is. Impatience asks for the impossible, wants to reach the goal without the means of getting there. The length of the journey has to be borne with, for every moment is necessary; and again we must halt at every stage, for each is itself a complete individual form, and is fully and finally considered only so far as its determinate character is taken and dealt with as a rounded and concrete whole, or only so far as the whole is looked at in the light of the special and peculiar character which this determination gives it. Because the substance of individual mind, nay, more, because the universal mind at work in the world, has had the patience to go through these forms in the long stretch of time’s extent, and to take upon itself the prodigious labour of the world’s history, where it bodied forth in each form the entire content of itself, as each is capable of presenting it; and because by nothing less could that all–pervading mind ever manage to become conscious of what itself is – for that reason, the individual mind, in the nature of the case, cannot expect by less toil to grasp what its own substance contains.
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (via itsquoted)
itsquoted:

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itsquoted:

We are offering Uvach, a highly customisable Tumblr theme, before its official release to our followers. Being responsive the theme will render flawlessly across devices from mobile phones to tablets to the good old pc. The offer will be available for a limited time.

The theme could be purchased securely here. The demo for the theme is available under this link. Great news is Uvach is appropriate both for the raconteurs as well as the visual chroniclers active in Tumblr!    

Whoever, with an earnest soul,
Strives for some end from this low world afar,
Still upward travels though he miss the goal,
And strays–but towards a star.
Edward Bulwer–Lytton (via itsquoted)

luckycompiler:

‘“Jean Baptiste Greuze,” Holmes continued, joining his finger tips and leaning well back in his chair, “was a French artist who flourished between the years 1750 and 1800. I allude, of course to his working career. Modern criticism has more than indorsed the high opinion formed of him by his contemporaries.”’ Thus reads a portion of Arthur Conan Doyle’s very first chapter of The Valley of Fear.

Even nearly three centuries later, modern connoisseurs corroborate Arthur Conan Doyle’s estimation of Jean Baptiste Greuze’s prowess as an artist. Greuze was born on August 21, 1725 in Tournus, Burgundy. After completing a few years in Lyon studying the nuances of art, Greuze moved on to Paris. From the very beginning Greuze’s intention was to be considered as a serious historical painter. Unfortunately, such inclinations of his brought him in direct confrontation with the Academy in Paris at a later date.

Late 1750s and ’60s observed the fullest expression of Jean Baptiste Greuze’s creative faculty. His paintings, while following a rococo style, thrived on melodrama. But drama was brewing inside the four walls of his home as well. A marital dissonance followed by a costly divorce and his own extravagance forced him into severe pecuniary distress. Even though he earned heftily through his paintings he died a destitute on March 4, 1805. His student and artist Constance Mayer was one of the very few to pay homage during his funeral.

itsquoted:

We are offering Uvach, a highly customisable Tumblr theme, before its official release to our followers. Being responsive the theme will render flawlessly across devices from mobile phones to tablets to the good old pc. The offer will be available for a limited time.
The theme could be purchased securely here. The demo for the theme is available under this link. Great news is Uvach is appropriate both for the raconteurs as well as the visual chroniclers active in Tumblr!    

itsquoted:

We are offering Uvach, a highly customisable Tumblr theme, before its official release to our followers. Being responsive the theme will render flawlessly across devices from mobile phones to tablets to the good old pc. The offer will be available for a limited time.

The theme could be purchased securely here. The demo for the theme is available under this link. Great news is Uvach is appropriate both for the raconteurs as well as the visual chroniclers active in Tumblr!    

luckycompiler:

Gerda Taro was among the first of female photojournalists to report from frontline. Born as Gerta Pohorylle on August 1, 1910 in Stuttgart, Taro spent her formative years in a boarding school in Switzerland. By the time she was in her early twenties Taro’s anti–Nazi sentiments forced the family to scatter across central Europe. She never got a chance to meet her family again.

In 1935, Gerda Taro met with young Hungarian photographer Endre Friedmann whom the world knows as Robert Capa. The two formed a close companionship. Taro was working for Alliance Photo as an editor when the planning for travelling to Barcelona was made at the outbreak of Spanish Civil War (1936). Capa and Taro covered the bloodshed and horrors of Aragon and Córdoba together.

When the Battle of Brunete (1937) turned particularly gory with reporters facing censorship imposed by the Republicans, Gerda Taro was almost the lone international figure collecting testimonies from the ground with her camera. The journey became a fateful one for her. On July 25, 1937 she was hit by a rampaging tank to die in a Madrid hospital the next day. Her time on earth was a brief one and her creative career even shorter. Yet, that short span of time acted like a spark of lightning to reveal the murkiness of the dark horizon.

luckycompiler:

Since Franz Xaver Messerschmidt’s death on August 19, 1783 numerous analysts, historians and scientists tried explaining the inspirations behind the grotesque figure–heads that the sculptor is famous for. Some of these hypotheses are no less bizarre than the sculptures themselves. While sifting through the maze of these interpretations what often gets overlooked are in fact of infinitely greater importance, namely, the skill of the artist and his power of observation.

Messerschmidt was born on February 6, 1736 in Swabia, Germany. Early death of his father left the family in doldrums. The artist had to work as a shepherd boy to earn his living. Even then the sketches he made of the natural beauty around foretold his future. Transplanted to his maternal uncle’s home in Munich, Messerschmidt received early education in creating sculptural pieces from his two uncles Johann Baptist Straub and Philipp Jakob Straub.

The artist was lucky in receiving commissions from Maria Theresa of Austria and Princess of Savoy, courtesy his innate talent and skillful execution. His late baroque style also scaled new heights with his trips to Rome and coming in touch with neoclassicism. But it is the acquaintance with Franz Mesmer and awareness of the latter’s revolutionary ideas that brought definitive touches to Messerschmidt’s art. He started creating busts depicting various facial expressions from about 1770 and continued till the very end. Such is the enduring appeal of his work that some two centuries later his sculptures, grimacing and wincing, continue enthralling us.

The force of mind is only as great as its expression; its depth only as deep as its power to expand and lose itself.
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (via itsquoted)
If you trust in nature, in the small things that hardly anyone sees and that can so suddenly become huge, immeasurable; if you have this love for what is humble and try very simply, as someone who serves, to win the confidence of what seems poor: then everything will become easier for you, more coherent and somehow more reconciling, not in your conscious mind perhaps, which stays behind, astonished, but in your innermost awareness, wakefulness, and knowledge.
Rainer Maria Rilke (via itsquoted)